The American government is suspending one third of its $2 billion annual funding to the Pakistani military, reports the L.A. Times. What equals out to about $800 million is no longer coming because of a strained relationship between the two countries that has grown particularly frosty over the few months since Osama Bin Laden's death in May. President Obama's chief of staff, William Daley, went on ABC's "This Week" and described the relationship as "very complicated." The New York Times is reporting the aid consists of, "about $300 million to reimburse Pakistan for some of the costs of deploying more than 100,000 soldiers along the Afghan border to combat terrorism, as well as hundreds of millions of dollars in training assistance and military hardware." The New York Times is also reporting that funding would resume if Pakistan pursued terrorism within their borders more aggressively and relations between the two countries generally improved. Nonmilitary aid is not being affected by the cuts at all. The move is another in a long list of of events leading the relationship into a, "downward spiral," according to Bruce Riedel, a former CIA officer, quoted in The L.A. Times