Rupert Murdoch finally gave his most extensive interview about the phone hacking scandal to a paper he owns The Wall Street Journal.

In an interview, Mr. Murdoch said News Corp. has handled the crisis "extremely well in every way possible," making just "minor mistakes."

According to The Journal's Bruce Orwall, the paper landed the interview with the boss because they were inquiring about the status of Murdoch's son James, who is News Corp.'s deputy chief operating officer and has been one of the most visible faces of the scandal after Murdoch himself.  The father gave a bellowing defense of his son and the company's management of the phone hacking crisis. Despite reprots that the Murdoch father and son have been at odds with each other in handling the scandal, Rupert told The Journal that James had handled the situation well:

"I think he acted as fast as he could, the moment he could," Mr. Murdoch said. The elder Mr. Murdoch said that he, too, had acted appropriately and quickly, saying, "when I hear something going wrong, I insist on it being put right." He said, however, that he attends to a lot of details in a multi-billion company with thousands of employees.

Murdoch also said that News Corp. would recover completely from the crisis, and that they have a reputation of great good works" in the U.K.

No paper, owned by Murdoch or not, would turn down an interview with Murdoch. Still, The Journal's piece had a couple awkward moments. For instance, when asked about rumors that News Corp. executives are considering selling or spinning off their British newspaper division, News International, Murdoch scoffed and called the reports "pure rubbish. Pure and total rubbish," adding in a very boss sort of way, "give it the strongest possible denial you can give." As it turns out it was The Wall Street Journal, by the way, that was the first to report those rumors.