As Dominique Strauss-Kahn awaits his trial (something that could take as long as six months), new details about his storied social life are beginning to unfurl. The airing out of his private life continues to meet sharp resistance in France: media companies could face litigation if they merely broadcast images of the IMF chief in handcuffs. But journalists, especially Americans, are marching forward sketching a portrait of his curious, prolific life. Here's what's being reported:

  • Strauss-Kahn's Many Wives  A profile by Bruce Crumley in Time chronicles the IMF chief's marriages. In 1963, at the age of 14, he met a 16-year-old named Helene Dumas. They soon began living together. His parents protested so they got married in 1967 when Strauss-Kahn was the equivalent of a high school senior. They have a daughter named Vanessa. As he advanced in his political career in the Socialist party he met a communications expert named Brigitte Guillemette. She changed his sartorial style and he fell in love with her. They married in 1984. They have a daughter named Camille. Later, as his political career continued to advance, Strauss-Kahn met a TV journalist named Anne Sinclair who his advisers said would help provide media coaching. She also turned out to be another love of his life and they married in 1989. Throughout their marriage he continued to have a reputation as a ladies man but Sinclair didn't seem to mind. "No, I'm actually rather proud of it!" she once said. "It's important to seduce for a politician. As long as he seduces me and I seduce him, that's good enough for me."
  • Strauss-Kahn's "Avalanche" of Women Meanwhile, a report by Fay Schlesinger in The Daily Mail uncovers the "avalanche" of women talking about their affairs with the IMF chief. The latest is a European journalist named only as Martina who says he demanded "almost directly that I had to sleep with him for an interview." There are also rumors of him having a dalliance with a Mexican chambermaid, which has resemblances of his alleged attack with the Guinean maid in New York. Thierry Ardisson, a French talk show host, tells the Mail that she had 14 female friends who spoke of instances when Strauss-Kahn attempted to "jump" them. "He needs therapy," she said. He apparently also routinely visited a Paris swingers' club called Les Chandelles.
  • A Double Life  In an article that appeared in the French newspaper Le Monde and translated by Worldcrunch, a report discusses Strauss-Kahn's mixed personalities: "He has always had a double reputation. For some time now, he has been recognized for his genuine economic capabilities and his careless behavior, his sparkling intelligence coupled with an apparent dilettantism, a mind as brilliantly clear as his relationship toward women is troublesome."