Wolf of Wall Street stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill are teaming up on a new film. So which famous movie star collaborators are they aiming to emulate? 

The duo's next project, according to Mike Fleming Jr. at Deadline, is the story of Richard Jewell, the security guard at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics who initially discovered the backpack containing the bomb, but was later treated as a suspect. Hill will play Jewell, while DiCaprio will play a lawyer, who helped him. Hill and DiCaprio have also paired to produce a hip hop TV series with Q-Tip.

So where is this collaboration leading? Let's see where their futures might lie. 

Michael Douglas and Danny DeVito

Though DiCaprio—in our humble opinion—is better looking than Douglas (even in his prime), and Hill's strange physique isn't quite as extreme as DeVito's, something about Leo and Jonah recall this pair, who teamed up so often in the '80s, from Romancing the Stone to Jewel of the Nile to The War of the Roses (all three in partnership with Kathleen Turner; there's still time for Margot Robbie to hop onto the Jewell film and make this a trio). It might be Hill and DiCaprio's bromantic (sorry) that brings Douglas and DeVito to mind. Have you heard about how DeVito once sucked poison out of Douglas' leg? Still, while Douglas and DeVito's pairing was built on a foundation of adventures/dark comedies, something tells us that with this later project Hill and DiCaprio have loftier goals. 

Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau

They're the classic Odd Couple, but not quite as screwball to be able to pull off a Quaalude attack.

Robert Redford and Paul Newman

While DiCaprio may be Newman-esque, Hill isn't even a schlubby version of Redford. Moving on. 

Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci

This, of course, is what DiCaprio and Hill are striving for in their Wolf team-up with Scorsese, despite the fact that neither Leo nor Jonah were quite as menacing in Wolf as De Niro and Pesci have the power to be.  But it looks like the pair may be moving away from Scorsese with this new project. The director does not appear to be eyeing the project, and the subject matter seems out of his typical wheelhouse.