Often times unexpected films end up as Oscar nominees—see: Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa—but perhaps the most bizarre nomination of all was one in the best song category for "Alone Yet Not Alone" from the film Alone Yet Not Alone

What exactly is Alone Yet Not Alone? Well, it's a story of a family during the French and Indian War, from Enthuse Entertainment, a production company which states on its website that its "vision is to produce God-honoring, faith based, family friendly films that inspire the human spirit to seek and know God." According to MovieGuide.org, "the family guide to movies and entertainment" the movie has a "Very strong evangelistic Christian worldview with the Gospel presented clearly and contrasting the Christian settlers with the pagan Indians and some strong moral elements about doing the right thing." 

We haven't seen the movie, though it looks like our Joe Reid will have to, but the trailer features—to put it gently—some very (very!) questionable portrayals of Native Americans as savage-like. 

The song itself is sung by Joni Eareckson Tada, a quad­riplegic evangelical.

Now, remember, the Best Original Song category shortlist was filled with nominees from a variety of obscure and strange-sounding films, including, yes, Alone Yet Not Alone and Kamasutra 3D. (Update: Worth noting, Alone Yet Not Alone's composer Bruce Broughton has been an Academy governor.) The shortlist was also packed with a number of high profile songs from major recording artists. The team behind Alone Yet Not Alone beat out Taylor Swift for her song from One Chance, Coldplay for their song from The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, and Lana Del Rey for her love theme from The Great Gatsby. We imagine Lana, sitting in a grand bedroom, alone, listening to her lyrics "will you still love me when I'm no longer young and beautiful?" with a single tear rolling down her face.