Because Hollywood execs want to make money and ensure that this generation of children will never sleep again, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark  a tome containing tales penned by a demon from hell — will be turned into a movie. Okay, fine, the stories are really urban legends and scary stories collected by author Alvin Schwartz. He is probably not a demon, or even part demon, but he singlehandedly traumatized many children with his book and two sequels.

Now, some 32 years after the first Scary Stories book was published, CBS films "has sprung for a pitch from Saw writers Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan" to adapt Schwartz's book, Deadline's Jen Yamato reports. Yamato also has some rough details about the plot:

I’m told it was a competitive bidding for the project, which will see Melton and Dunstan adapt some of the Scary short stories into a screenplay about a group of outcast kids who stand up to their fears to save their town when nightmares come to life. 

That got us to thinking about the stories which stories ate our dreams and twisted them into nightmares. And here are some picks that we hope the movie doesn't ignore: 

"The Red Spot"

Arachnophobia? Check. Hypochondria? Yup. Boils? Mmhmm. Add those three together and a girl named Ruth and you have a story which made every young kid imagine that every rash, bump, mole, or zit on their cheek was actually a spider's nest waiting to erupt. 

"The Girl with the Green Ribbon"

This story forever ruined women's neckwear for me. 

"Room for One More"

The real reason why my coworker Elspeth Reeve always pauses before entering a full elevator isn't because she hates being crowded. It's because she wants to make sure that she won't plummet to her death. 

"Harold"

A story that makes you glad you never had to work on a farm:

"Sam's New Pet"

Oh Sam, your parents are really terrible. 

If all else fails, Melton and Dunstan should just create a 4-minute slideshow of illustrations by Stephen Gammell, the mastermind who seared this creepy lady (among other things) into our brains: