So Phil Robertson, patriarch of the Duck Dynasty clan and self-proclaimed "Bible-thumper," said a whole bunch of homophobic things in GQ's new issue:

It seems like, to me, a vagina—as a man—would be more desirable than a man's anus. That's just me. I'm just thinking: There's more there! She's got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I'm saying? But hey, sin: It’s not logical, my man. It’s just not logical.

and:

Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there. Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men ... Don't be deceived. Neither the adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers—they won't inherit the kingdom of God. Don't deceive yourself. It’s not right.

Then he went off to a "private Bible study" with a female cocaine addict who needed to be shown "the right direction."

Well, GLAAD didn't appreciate Robertson's remarks ("some of the vilest and most extreme statements uttered against LGBT people in a mainstream publication"). Nor did the Human Right Campaign ("Phil Robertson has a responsibility to set a positive example for young Americans – not shame and ridicule them because of who they are"). They weren't alone. Robertson later released this non-apology statement through A&E, saying, in part:

My mission today is to go forth and tell people about why I follow Christ and also what the Bible teaches, and part of that teaching is that women and men are meant to be together. However, I would never treat anyone with disrespect just because they are different from me. We are all created by the Almighty and like Him, I love all of humanity. We would all be better off if we loved God and loved each other.

Also deserving of our attention are Robertson's comments about the lives of black people in pre-Civil-Rights-era Louisiana, which are ignorant, bordering on racist. His outrageous comments on homosexuality largely overshadowed this. They shouldn't:

I never, with my eyes, saw the mistreatment of any black person. Not once. Where we lived was all farmers. The blacks worked for the farmers. I hoed cotton with them. I'm with the blacks, because we're white trash. We're going across the field.... They're singing and happy. I never heard one of them, one black person, say, ‘I tell you what: These doggone white people’—not a word!... Pre-entitlement, pre-welfare, you say: Were they happy? They were godly; they were happy; no one was singing the blues.

Yes, I'm so sure black people were "singing and happy" and never had to deal with any kind of "mistreatment" whatsoever. Maybe he never heard them complain about "these doggone white people" because they were afraid to? Why am I even bothering to question this nonsense?

Anyway, A&E has decided to put the star of its highest-rated show on "indefinite hiatus" from filming. Mind you, it hasn't placed the entire show on indefinite hiatus -- just Robertson.

Forbes' Clare O'Connor worried that Robertson's comment could "put Walmart and A&E's $400 million empire at stake" (Walmart made about $200 million in revenue off of Duck Dynasty merchandise in 2013, O'Connor says), but I doubt the majority of Walmart shoppers who buy Duck Dynasty gear are all that concerned about what the show's star thinks about gay people.

Think Robertson will be off A&E's airwaves forever? It's doubtful. Remember Dog the Bounty Hunter, A&E's last breakout hit show? It went on an indefinite hiatus when its star was caught using racial slurs in October 2007. 

Almost four months later, after the fuss died down and Dog (who is also big into the born again Christian thing) made several tear-filled apologies, A&E announced it would resume production on his show. Let's see how long it'll take the network to reinstate Phil Robertson.