Though Robert Pattinson stuck by her, Ben Affleck has left Kristen Stewart in the dust. Citing a schedule crunch, the actor has backed out of Focus, a con-artist movie set to costar Stewart and begin filming this spring. Stewart had just said in a recent interview that she was excited to start shooting, but now who knows what will happen. "Hi Kristen. We know that you were excited about working with Ben, but he dropped out, so we got you a replacement," a producer says to her the day she arrives on set. "Brad?" the producer calls, and Kristen gets all excited, she's always wanted to work with him. The trailer door opens and Kristen thinks, This is it. But then some cheeseball guy comes walking down the steps, grinning like a goof, and the producer says, "Kristen Stewart, meet Brad Womack, former Bachelor," and Kristen fiddles in her pocket for her phone and types "SOS" to her agent. Why'd you have to do Kiki Stew like that, Ben? [Entertainment Weekly]

You know Psych? That's a show on the USA network that I'm pretty sure not a single human in all the world, from the deep Amazon rainforests to the high steppes of Mongolia, has ever watched. And yet it's been on for years and years. It is USA's longest-running show — the network's, not the country's. The country's longest-running show is, oddly, Chuck — and has just been renewed for an eighth season. Eight! Do you know how many seasons Rome and Freaks and Geeks and The Comeback got? Not eight! And here's Psych, comin' in at eight. It will likely be the show's last season, as USA ordered only eight episodes, but that is a mighty impressive run. Really impressive considering no one has ever seen the show. Not a single person. "What is Psyche?" they ask, from the taiga of Finland to those huddled around mighty Uluru. And nobody knows. [Deadline]

Charlie Rose has settled a lawsuit with a bunch of interns who claim his show illegally worked them for free, despite a New York State law barring unpaid internships unless they are academic or vocational. And Charlie Rose's show is neither of those. The lawsuit was initially filed by one woman who will never work in this town again, and now there are 189 future god knows what they'll be doings but it sure as sh-t isn't gonna be TV, not if Chuck Rose has anything to say about it. Rose's show has just agreed to pay $1,100 to each one, totaling $207,900. So it's not a lotta scratch, but it's the principle of the thing that matters, you see. Ol' Charlie Rose can't get away with slave labor, no matter what dark recesses of his studio he hides the truth in. [Deadline]

Amazon Studios, the original programming arm of the online retailer, has just ordered a new slate of pilots, and there are some exciting prospects. There's a behind-the-scenes, though scripted, look at The Onion News. There's a show from a Daily Show writer that's a musical comedy about young twentysomethings who start new jobs at a New York news website. ("Here I am at the Wire / My god my heart is on fiiire!" Call me, guys.) And then there's a show called Supanatural, produced by The Daily Show's Kristen Schaal and co-written, with Lily Sparks and Ryan Sandoval, by Price Peterson, a very funny recapper of things like Teen Wolf and, yes, a friend. Yay for everyone. And good luck. May you return dead or victorious, but never in defeat. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Here's a new red-band trailer (meaning: cover your eyes, swearaphobics) for the upcoming Sandra Bullock/Melissa McCarthy buddy cop comedy The Heat. In this case red band really does just mean swears, with McCarthy getting out a lot of f's and s's, and Sandra getting one trailer-closing motherf'er in there at the end. Doesn't really add much to our impression of the movie, but that's OK, it's already reasonably high. F on, friends!