Today in books and publishing: E.L. James' husband isn't a dom; Cosmopolis reconsidered; NYPD called in for Junot Díaz reading; Pussy Riot to storm e-readers.

Pussy Riot: the e-book. The City University of New York's Feminist Press plans to release Pussy Riot! A Punk Prayer for Freedom on Sept. 21st. The e-book will collect writings about the punk band/feminist collective who incurred the Russian government's wrath by performing an anti-Putin song in Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior. Though the international community responded in protest and anger at the Russian government's response, three Pussy Riot members were imprisoned following a show trial. The book will feature contributions from Yoko Ono, Johanna Fateman, Karen Finley, Justin Vivian Bond, Eileen Myles, and JD Samson. Profits will benefit the Pussy Riot legal defense team. [The Feminist Press]

Junot Díaz New York appearance was a zoo. Typically, book signings are about as quiet and uneventful as public gatherings can possibly get. But Junot Díaz's appearance at the New York's Union Square Barnes and Noble location last night nearly descended into a riot, according to Colorlines. In preparation for Díaz's discussion and signing of the just-released story collection This is How You Lose Her, even organizers set up about 400 chairs. But well over 1,000 readers showed up, and NYPD had to be brought in for crowd control. [Colorlines]

E.L. James' husband speaksFifty Shades readers who thought E.L. James' BDSM-themed books were based on kinky personal experience might be disappointed by Niall Leonard's appearance on NBC Today. James' husband says, "I am not the inspiration for Christian Grey," and clarifies that he and James don't have a room full of sex toys. He makes the couple's life sound totally vanilla: "We have the kids at school. We have to walk the dogs. We have to do the shopping. All that stuff still happens." [Today]

Jessica Lange secures children's book deal. With Oscars, Golden Globes and an Emmy to her name, Jessica Lange already has plenty of impressive objects to decorate her shelves with. If she really wants to be a show-off about it, she'll soon able to prop her own children's book next to all the awards. Jabberwocky, an imprint of Sourcebooks, has signed a deal with Lange to release her picture book It Is About a Little Bird. For the images, Lange took photographs that her husband later illustrated. In the book, two girls visiting their grandmother on a farm "come upon an old birdcage," says Steve Geck, editorial manager at Sourcebooks. "When they ask her about it, she tells them the story, how she grew up in France and had this bird as a pet and what it meant to her." [The New York Times]

Following settlement, will Amazon secure an e-book monopoly? In today's Los Angeles Times, Michael Hiltzik says what everyone else following the government's settlement with three major publishers is thinking: Amazon is poised to secure a monopoly on e-books. He argues that by targeting Apple and publishers for allegedly colluding to raise e-book prices, "In essence, the government walked blithely past the increasing threat of an Amazon monopoly and went after the stakeholders who were trying to keep it from taking root." Prices are already coming down on Amazon, which will certainly entice readers. "Book buyers will think they've gotten a bounty," Hiltzik warns, "but Amazon will have some of its old power to build toward a monopoly." [Los Angeles Times]

Was Cosmopolis prescient? For someone comfortably perched at or near the top of the American fiction totem pole, Don DeLillo has gotten a lot of bad reviews in the last then years. His 2003 novel Cosmopolis was particularly poorly received. The New York Times Book Review, hardly alone in its loathing, called DeLillo's book "a totalitarian reading experience that clicks by without surprise or spontaneity." But now, following the financial meltdown and David Cronenberg's adaptation, some are reconsidering the book's merits. Cornel Bonca was disappointed by the book when he first read it, but now finds it prescient. In today's Los Angeles Review of Bookhe writes: 

... it appears to me that Don DeLillo has once again taken on the mantle of artist-prophet. Cosmopolis’s grimness — and it is hell-dark, a near Miltonic vision of greed, chaos, and soul-squandering — is, it turns out, an altogether apt reflection of its theme, which is the remorseless momentum of post-Berlin Wall capitalism, of a New World Order that has no symmetrical foe aside from "terrorism" and which is wedded inexorably to technologies of such seamless, speed-of-light efficiency that it promises the very transcendence of the physical, an escape from mortality itself into the dream-realm of the cybernetic. 

[Los Angeles Review of Books]

Next Chapter Bookshop hastily closed. Why Lanora Haradon decided to close her Milwaukee area business The Next Chapter Bookshop is anyone's guess. Haradon opened the bookstore in 2009 after the historic Harry W. Schwartz Books shuttered, and her store seemed to be faring well. Events were scheduled and Haradon chaired the Midwest Independent Booksellers Association (her resignation from the MIBA is effective immediately). The headline on her nearly barren website simply reads, "Next Chapter Bookshop Opened 04/01/2009 - Closed Forever 09/11/2012." Bookstore closures in this economy are fairly common, but the lack of context for this one remains puzzling. [Publishers Weekly]