Today in books and publishing: Anna Karenina fashion; Jane Austen's ring; Katie Roiphe on Sheila Heti; a medieval manuscript recovered in a garage. 

Karenina-wear: Because nothing says Leo Tolstoy like Banana Republic, the company is coming out with an Anna Karenina-inspired line of clothing in the fall leading up to the release of the Keira Knightly-starring film adaptation. The movie's costume designer will "curate" the collection. [NYDN]

Pride and prejudice and jewelry: Your finger might be able to don the ring that belonged to the woman from whose fingers came Pride and Prejudice (got that?). A ring once belonging to Jane Austen is one of the items up for sale at a Sotheby's auction set to take place July 10. The turquoise bauble comes with a note from Jane's sister-in-law Eleanor Austen to niece Caroline, which reads: 

My dear Caroline. The enclosed Ring once belonged to your Aunt Jane. It was given to me by your Aunt Cassandra as soon as she knew that I was engaged to your Uncle. I bequeath it to you. God bless you!

And now you can bequeathed to yourself for some tens of thousands of dollars! Austen first editions are also for sale at the English Literature, History, Children's Books and Illustrations, as are various other literary wonders[Jacket Copy, The Paris Review Daily, Sotheby's]

How Katie Roiphe should be: It was bound to happen. Katie Roiphe, Slate's resident contrarian, takes on Sheila Heti's novel How Should a Person Be?, and she's not really a fan. References dropped include Girls, Zooey Deschanel, Miranda July, J.D. Salinger and Wes Anderson. [Slate]

"Girly" books: Heti's book also provokes Anna North at BuzzFeed to consider the trend of "girly" stories and how they are received. North concludes:

"Girly" stories may still not be taken as seriously as manly ones, but with the success of How Should A Person Be? and Girls (which Heti says she watched religiously and admires), they're becoming increasingly high-profile. Whether that means that authors who write about girly subjects will be canonized alongside male authors of the past and present remains to be seen.

 [BuzzFeed via TPR Daily]

Some garage sale: A 12th-century illuminated manuscript was found in a garage in Spain belonging to a former employee of the cathedral from which the text was stolen almost a year ago. The Codex Calixtinus, according to the BBC, "is considered the first guide for those following the ancient pilgrimage route to Santiago." A large sum of cash and other books stolen from the cathedral were also found in the garage. [BBC, HuffPost, @AbeBooks]