Lost creator and writer Damon Lindelof suggested, and then quickly retracted, an idea that those headed to see The Dark Knight Rises pay respect to victims of the Aurora, Colorado, shooting with a moment of silence. It's not surprising that people are having a tough time figuring out how to see an immensely anticipated film in the wake of a tragedy. Lindelof tweeted Friday: 

@DamonLindelof: Going to see DARK KNIGHT TONIGHT. Humbly suggest staying in our seats for a minute of silence when end credits roll.

He was retweeted over 500 times in less than an hour, with some replying to say they liked the idea, but others suggesting it was silly or self-indulgent. After ultimately deleting his original suggestion this afternoon, he wrote: "Okay, Twitter. Lesson learned. This was a bad idea. Deleting tweet now. #CynicsWin." But opinion seemed split, even after that, on the merits of the idea. 

This all comes after police departments announced they'll be adding extra security to late night screenings Friday, as Warner Bros. assesses how to keep marketing the film, and as AMC asks theater-goers not to wear costumes that might make others uncomfortable. Clearly, the question of if and when to see it and how to feel while doing so is high on people's minds. It seems there's no right way to approach it. The New York Times's David Carr tweeted that he would "see Dark Knight tonite as personal pushback, but feels a little like Bush2 telling people to go shopping after 9/11," the idea there being, we should stay strong, but that encouraging people to make a statement of solidarity by giving their money to a movie studio feels weird, too.

What we thought was nice about the moment of silence idea is that it doesn't urge people to march to the theaters as an act of resistance, but instead suggests a way for those who wanted to see the movie—and that's a whole, whole lot of people based on pre-sales—to quietly pay respect.