Welcome back to the Box Office Report where doing karaoke with Tom Cruise in the 1980s sounds like a great story to hear from Dustin Hoffman at 4 a.m.

1. Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (Dreamworks): $35.5 million in 4,263 theaters [week 2]

After three more big screen sequels, and about a hundred straight-to-DVD side adventures, everyone who works from Dreamworks will pack up and call it a day and retire somewhere warm. The Madagascar franchise will have made them all rich, so they can enjoy the rest of their life on a beach sipping cocktails out of coconuts with little umbrellas not worrying about real-life things. 

2. Prometheus (Fox): $20.2 million in 3,442 theaters [week 2]

"Were you as disappointed as I was?" we found ourselves asking our father after seeing Prometheus. We're both big fans of Ridley Scott, and the movie certainly was pretty to look at, but the plot was terrible and the characters were low-tide shallow. Theron, Fassbender and Rapace did commendable jobs with the script they were given, but Damon Lindelof should be embarrassed for producing a script that poor. Complaints about the script clearly had an effect on its performance considering it dropped 60 percent from what it made last week. 

3. Rock of Ages (Warner Brothers): $15.1 million in 3,470 theaters

This movie should be a lot of fun, but by all accounts it's boring and self-serious. Somehow they took the fun out of a movie with Tom Cruise doing his best Vince Neil impersonation and Alec Baldwin in a supporting Role. Lawson said it was, "a very bad movie."

4. Snow White and the Huntsman (Universal): $13.8 million in 3,701 theaters [Week 3]

As much as we love having two different Charlize Theron movies in theaters at the same time, it means we won't see her again until sometime next year. She's lined up for a Hancock sequel and a Mad Max reboot with Tom Hardy (!), but neither have a definite release date. Her impending disappearance makes us sad. 

5. That's My Boy (Sony): $13 million in 3,030 theaters 

This is a huge disappointment for the normally bankable Sandler. Last year's Jack & Jill took in $25 million in its opening weekend, and Sandler's only co-star was himself in a female fat suit. Here, he's got the young and hip Andy Samberg. Why so little love? Are audiences finally realizing Sandler hasn't done anything worthwhile since Funny People?