We realize there's only so much time one can spend in a day watching new trailers, viral video clips, and shaky cell phone footage of people arguing on live television. This is why every day The Atlantic Wire highlights the videos that truly earn your five minutes (or less) of attention. Today: Tupac lives in hologram form, how the blind use an iPhone, inside the mind of a brand-new Pulitzer prize winner and Amsterdam prostitutes dance to stop human trafficking.

Playing into that Tupac isn't really dead myth, the West Coast rapper made an appearance last night at the Coachella music festival. The faux Pac, who was murdered in 1998, appeared during Snoop Dogg's set to perform, "Come With me," "Gangsta Party," "Hail Mary" and "Americaz Most Wanted." The whole plan was Dr. Dre's idea, who talked to the illusion during the performance, saying. "Me and my n---- Snoop Dogg have been together for 20 years!" notes MTV. TMZ says the crowd went "insane" for the deceased rapper, calling his movements "remarkably lifelike." Those "remarkably lifelike" movement, however, look remarkably creepy to us. Guess you had to be there? [TMZ]

This blind man shows us what we read about two falls ago over at The Atlantic, how the iPhone's voice control has changed phone use for blind users. Following Austin Seraphin's deep review of the the iPhone 4 in the fall of 2010, Tommy Edison, who has been blind since birth, gives us a more practical tour of the new updated Siri phone. "I have seen a lot of technology for the blind, and I can safely say that the iPhone represents the most revolutionary thing to happen to the blind for at least the last ten years," wrote Seraphin about a year and a half ago. And that was before Siri! [The Atlantic Video]

In a sort of flash mob meets activism type deal, these dancers dressed as prostitutes do a fly techno dance to raise awareness for human trafficking. It's clever and mesmerizing, but the best bit comes at the minute 11 mark, when a very old man, who has found himself in Amsterdam's red light district, looks absolutely dumbfounded.  [Ads of the World]

After this afternoon's Pulitzer announcement, The Awl dug up this News Hour clip from about a year ago of poetry winner Tracy K. Smith, who won for her poetry collection Life on Mars. Here she does a reading of a poem from the collection, My God, It's Full of Stars, explaining the research behind this project and forming her conception of the future and space travel. [The News Hour via The Awl]