Today in books and publishing: The real-life history behind Game of Thrones, David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust phase is getting the celebrity biography treatment, and Canada's libraries balk at Random House's e-book price hike. 

Just the other day, we were lamenting (offline) the lack of a definitive David Bowie biography. Now comes word that British GQ editor Dylan Jones has reached a deal with publisher Trevor Dolby to write a bio of Bowie's Ziggy Stardust phase. This is good news, though we were kind of hoping for a book that covered his weird Berlin/Brian Eno days, but as they say, celebrity biography beggars can't be choosers. The book, called When Ziggy Played Guitar, will published in the United Kingdom in June. [The Bookseller]

If you're a fan of Game of Thrones -- and who isn't these days, what with the swordplay and copious nudity -- you may be intrigued by Salon's rundown of the best books about the War of the Roses, which provides the historical framework for author George RR Martin's big and bloody novels about kingdomly upheaval and palace intrigue. Admittedly, the texts, including Barbra Tuchman's A Distant Mirror and Alison Weir's The War of the Roses, are long on history and short on dragons, but still: Game of Thrones!    [Salon]

Oh, no: Nova Scotia's libraries have stopped buying Random House e-books in the wake of the publisher's price increase earlier this month. In a statement, chief librarian Troy Myers notes that because the libraries have to buy their titles from the publisher directly, a book like Robert K. Massie's Catherine The Great -- which has a list price of $22.69 when purchased via Amazon's Kindle Store -- cost libraries $85 as of March 20. That does seem high, especially since most readers will already know how the story ends. [GalleyCat]

Lauren Scruggs, the Dallas fashion model who gruesomely walked into a plane propeller and lost her eye and arm four months ago, is closing in on a book deal. Potential publishers and terms weren't mentioned, though E!'s Jason Kennedy told Savannah Guthrie that the potential book will be "very upbeat" and "very inspirational," which will be nice. [The Today Show]