The Call Sheet sifts through the day's glut of Hollywood news to find the stories even non-industry types care about. Today: The two cool guys are putting something together, AMC gets back in the comic business, and LMFAO is trying to make it official.

Ed TV costars and all around laid-back dudes Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson are teaming up once again to do a television series, all about detectives in the South. The idea is that they'll do eight episodes and solve a murder mystery at the end of them (for real this time, no Rosie Larsening around, guys) and then the next season it will be a whole new set of characters and a new mystery and everything. So American Horror Story but about two drawlin' detectives wandering around the bayou. There's no network attached to this, but they're aiming for premium cable it seems. They have Jane Eyre director Cary Fukunaga (nice choice!) attached to direct all eight episodes, two of which are already written, so they've got like a lot established already, which could be enticing to networks. Though, of course it doesn't really matter in the end how prepared they are, as despite the director and scripts and whatnot all that's gonna happen when "action" is called is that Woody and Matthew will start lazily going "Hyuuuhhhhhhhhhhh" while rolling around in hammocks, for hours. Still, we respect the effort. [Deadline]

Curiously enough the producers of Justified are looking to cast Modern Family clown (quite literally!) Eric Stonestreet as some sort of villain next season. Hm. That's interesting casting! Obviously Stonestreet can play things other than a charmingly oafish and mincing fop, but a villain? On Justified? Seems strange to us. But what do we know. If they want to do it, they should do it. In related news, Jesse Tyler Ferguson has been tapped to step into the role of Loras Tyrell on Game of Thrones. [The Wrap]

AMC is working to develop another show based on a Robert Kirkman comic, following the successful end of The Walking Dead's second season. The comic is called Thief of Thieves and it is a sequel to Prince of Thieves and the show will star Kevin Costner and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio. No, no, just kidding. The world is not *that* kind to us. Thieves is about a thief trying to reform but who can't stop thieving so he only thieves what other thieves have thieved. It's basically Dexter but instead of murder it's thieving. They should just call it Dexter: Thief Edition. C'mon, guys. Just call it that. Anyway, we look forward to nothing interesting happening on this show until the end of the second season, as is AMC/Kirkman tradition. [Entertainment Weekly]

The band LMFAO is trying to trademark its name for various merchandising purposes. They've submitted an application to the U.S. Trademark Office to get LMFAO, a common web expression, trademarked. They say it stands for "Laughing My Freaking Ass Off." No swears, guys. Well no bad swears anyway. So, this is completely ridiculous. But not as ridiculous as the fact that one of the guys in LMFAO is the other guy's nephew. So. Think on that for a while. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Yay. The wonderful Donna Murphy, known the world over as Juliet Simone the ballet coach in Center Stage, has officially been cast as The Witch in this summer's Public Theater production of Into the Woods in Central Park. She joins the previously cast Amy Adams and a whole host of good theater actors. Man. This thing is just going to be impossible to get a ticket to. Not as impossible as it would have been had Meryl Streep taken this role, as was rumored, but still pretty damn hard. I mean, Center Stage is one of the most watched movies of all time. Right? Isn't it? You guys all watch it all the time over and over again too, right? OK. Thought so. [The New York Times]

It seems that The Hunger Games director Gary Ross opted out of the second film because he didn't like the available production schedule, which was constricted because the film's star Jennifer Lawrence has a preexisting contract with Fox to film the X-Men: First Class sequel, which starts in January. So basically Ross would only have like four months to do the whole thing and he didn't feel comfortable with that so that's why he's out. There was probably some money stuff involved too, but this seems to be the main reason. Who should replace him? We have some ideas! [The Hollywood Reporter]

The three writers of the Broadway musical Wicked — Gregory Maguire who wrote the original novel, Winnie Holzman who wrote the book of the musical, and Stephen Schwartz who wrote all the music and lyrics — have all split some $95 million in profit since the show debuted in 2003. So... that's pretty insane. Write a musical, guys. Write a big fat hit musical and never work for the rest of your lives. Everyone, just go write a musical. Goodbye. [Bloomberg]

Here's video of Uma Thurman singing a song on the next episode of NBC's theater school cautionary tale Smash. She sounds... OK? Not great, but OK. Which is appropriate for this show.