The New York Post is going big on the story of the dating spreadsheet guy, in so much, at least, as it's making news in the paper for a second day in a row. Thursday we defended our hapless romantic spreadsheet user—a man who used an Excel document to "keep track of" dates he met on Match.com—for his use of the system, if not for the fact that he actually sent the file to one of his dates (who does that?). Now, we hear from an actual human woman who interacted with him online, though they never actually went on a date. Guess what? She was ranked highly! A 9.5! And she's "furious at the woman who made the meticulously detailed list public." 

“Why would she send it to the whole world?” fumed Liliana Beidaut, a 26-year-old makeup artist who got the highest rating, a 9.5, on the infamous Excel dating scorecard of finance whiz David Merkur, 28.

Beidaut spoke to ABC News, calling the dater who made the spreadsheet public, a 26-year-old named Arielle whom Merkur liked enough to send the spreadsheet, "spiteful." Beidaut is also angry that her photo, which was on the spreadsheet, is "everywhere now," and she's considering legal action. Of course, knowing the news cycle, Beidaut's best bet to keep herself on the down-low might have been to simply not talk to the news at all. Then again, she does have a bit of a point. At least her ranking was positive, however: "Looks beautiful; from coastal Romania; Chanel make-up artist." 

On the plus side for Merkur, Beidaut thinks he is "really nice," "trying to keep himself organized," and "was really looking for a girl." So maybe things could work out for these two lovebirds in the end, huh? Beidaut has also, apparently, "gotten a lot of calls from random people saying, 'Oh, you're the 9.5.'" Like we said, spreadsheets: Bringing people together.