We realize there's only so much time one can spend in a day watching new trailers, viral video clips, and shaky cell phone footage of people arguing on live television. This is why every day The Atlantic Wire highlights the videos that truly earn your five minutes (or less) of attention. Today: Gary Oldman and Charlie Rose hit it off, NASA sees something alarming on earth and violates our pact, and Wes Anderson directs a Hyundai commercial without a musical assist from Ja Rule.

Gary Oldman was interviewed for a full hour on Charlie Rose last night and it was exceptional. You can always tell when Rose is losing interest in an interview, because he'll abruptly prompt the guest on what they're there to promote. It's his way of saying, snap out of it, we're on television here, not at the nexus of the universe, despite what the black curtains would have you believe. That didn't happen once in his interview with Oldman. They easily could have talked another five hours, and probably did, what with Rose's reported aversion to going to bed at a decent hour. You'll have to click through for the full interview, but here are two lovely discussions on mellowing with age and the proper way to play George Smiley. [PBS]


We enjoy it when NASA shows time-lapse videos of what squatty little rovers did for three years on Mars. It's more troubling when they use elevation models to capture video of an 18-mile crack in the Pine Island Glacier. Making matters worse is the fact the crack is only getting bigger and could soon break off into an iceberg that's almost as big as Rhode Island. Since everyone's garbling George Costanza quotes this week, we think it should be noted that we had a pact, NASA. You supply the wondrous images of the galaxy, and we look the other way on the earthly problems that might be more deserving of funds and public attention. [Live Science via TPM]

Wes Anderson has directed a Hyundai commercial that's going to air during the Academy Awards. It's worth watching, but know this: The first time through, the absence of Ja Rule on the soundtrack will probably limit your enjoyment. It becomes less of a problem the second time, but is still noticeable. In the director's case, meme and man have almost become interchangeable. Which could be a problem for Anderson going forward, unless all future Anderson montages are set to something from the Def Jam catalogue. [HyundaiUSA]