Every morning, The Atlantic Wire bring you the gossip coverage, filtered. Today: Jay-Z fired half of the employees at Rocawear the day before his daughter was born, investigating the unusual "tango tinge" of Leonardo DiCaprio, Bradley Cooper, and Gerard Butler, and Condé Nast buys some more One World Trace Center office space.

BLT Steak at 16th and I Streets in D.C. was the first couple's restaurant of choice for Michaelle Obama's 48th birthday celebration last night. The Obamas were joined in the restaurant's private dining room by "several friends," including Valerie Jarrett and Eric Holder. The highlight of the evening -- from a regular diner's perspective -- was when the president went to the men's room in the middle of the meal and "took a slow walk back through the main dining room, shaking hands and greeting fellow diners." Per the pool report, the Obamas returned to the White House at 9:42 p.m., too late to experience any of the excitement related to the smoke bomb that had been thrown near the North Portico earlier in the evening.  [The Reliable Source]

On January 6 -- one day before Beyonce gave birth to Blue Ivy -- 28 of the 56 employees at Jay-Z's clothing company Rocawear got laid off. The two events are not necessarily connected, but you wish Jay-Z had pushed back a little harder against reports he was spending $1.3 million on Beyonce's fancy delivery suite and inconveniencing the other parents at Lenox Hill Hospital who just wanted to see their newborns.  [Animal NY via The New York Observer]

Bradley Cooper, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Gerard Butler looked great at the Golden Globes: but did they look a little too good? A little too...golden perhaps? Apparently people are buzzing about the "tango tinge" (!) all three actors were sporting and thus worried that there's a "fake bake" epidemic breaking out among Hollywood's leading men. Judge for yourself, though we're not sure we see it. [Page Six]

Condé Nast has already leased 1.05 million feet of office space in the uncompleted One World Trade Center, at an estimated cost of $2 billion over 25 years. Now, sources say the media company wants more room to spread out, and is planning to lease an additional 133,000 square feet of space, which according to The New York Observer will be on the 42nd, 43rd, and 44th floors. That means the publisher will occupy floors 20 through 44 in the 1,776-foot-tall tower, which is scheduled to be completed in "mid-late" 2014. [New York Post and The New York Observer]

Jimmy Fallon got more than the usual competent clarinet playing when he went to see Woody Allen and his jazz band perform at Cafe Carlyle in Manhattan on Monday night. After Allen wrapped his set the rest of the Eddy Davids New Orleans "spotted Fallon and urged the Late Night host to the stage," where he gave a well-received imprormptu performance of the Mills Bros. "Daddy's Little Girl." It's unclear if his Anything Else director stuck around to witness the performance. [Page Six]

Oh no: it seems that Johnny Depp and longtime girlfriend Vanessa Paradis are leading "sad separate lives." That's the worst kinds of separate living. This week's issue of People magazine has the full post-mortem, but even the abstract they posted to the Web sounds grim, with "multiple sources saying the relationship is "all but officially finished", while some friends say they've already split. [People]

Regis Philbin -- who would very much like to be back on TV -- took on a bath on the sale of his Greenwich house, which he listed for $6.8 million back in 2008, but just recently sold for $3 million. Looking at the pictures of the property (courtesy of Curbed), we'd suggest it was lacking the Regis touch, which is to say: lots and lots of gewgaws and figurines. This den, in particular, is crying out for a life-sized Joe Montana bobblehead doll, or a chessboard in which all the pieces are scale-model versions of Regis. This looks nice, but perhaps a bit drab. [Radar]

The producers of Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark have filed a countersuit against axed director Julie Taymor, and it's a doozy. Among the more notable claims in the 66-page brief filed by lawyers on behalf of the show's producers: that Taymor "refused to develop a musical that followed the original, family-friendly ‘Spider-Man’ story...[and] insisted on developing a dark, disjointed and hallucinogenic musical involving suicide, sex and death." then, when fellow creators Bono and The Edge came to her with major changes the producers that the producers wanted to implement to save the show, she apparently declared she "could not and would not do the jobs that she was contracted to do" and that she was fired for refusing to make those changes. Taymor is seeking $1 million in royalty payments she says she owed from the production, plus future royalty payments. The new lawsuit is having none of that, taking the position that she "violated her contract and should be denied royalty payments from the Broadway show and from any future productions of Spider-Man." [The New York Times]