We realize there's only so much time one can spend in a day watching new trailers, viral video clips, and shaky cell phone footage of people arguing on live television. This is why every day The Atlantic Wire highlights the videos that truly earn your five minutes (or less) of attention.

Monday was not a good day to be releasing trailers for movies that were not The Dark Knight Rises, so it's probably a good thing that 20th Century Fox only decided to release the trailer for the trailer of Ridley Scott's Prometheus to build up buzz. But when the competition has Bane and Bruce Wayne and Catwoman, underlit shots of futuristic cars and Ridley Scott in a North Face, it doesn't don't do much to build anticipation in advance of the full trailer, which arrives Thursday and will hopefully be easier to see. [Cinema Blend]
 

Loudon Wainwright III -- father to Rufus in real life, and Steven on Undeclared -- delivers what would have been the death blow to Newt Gingrich's White House prospects, if only Newt Gingrich still had White House prospects: a parody song set to "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town" noting Gingrich's numerous weaknesses as a candidate. Devastating, but at this point, it might be 36 hours too late. [CultureHubNYC]

Tom Cruise has been leaping and cavorting and sprinting across movie screens for nearly 30 years now. 30 years! What's more remarkable is that his gait hasn't changed, despite nearly three decades running slightly out of balance, with his weight shifted to his right side. Good for Tom Cruise, but bad for his knees. [Time]

Senior citizens in a Lawrence, Kansas have been filmed participating in a flash mob in Target. On the one hand, their enthusiasm is admirable and commendable. But should people over the age of five who (probably) don't know about Internet memes be encouraged to act them out in big box stores?   [Vulture]

The Wall Street Journal has a fascinating story about the tiny village in Israel that's home to the country's only regulation hockey rink. Once again, we're reminded that news features about thriving sports subcultures in places not associated with those sports are tough to beat, unless there is a time lapse video involved   [The Wall Street Journal]