Today in sports: The NBA eyes a Christmas start date as labor talks continue, college football's post-season has the potential to be historically messy this year, and American Samoa's soccer team snaps a 17-year streak of futility. 

  • Three weeks after defeating the Alabama Crimson Tide in college football's de facto national title game, the top-ranked LSU Tigers are playing the No. 3 Arkansas Razorbacks this afternoon in Baton Rouge. If Arkansas manages to pull the upset, it will be a ightmare scenario for college football's much-maligned Bowl Championship Series, with as many five one-loss teams -- Alabama, LSU, Arkansas, Oklahoma State, and Boise State -- plus the undefeated University of Houston all being in the mix to play in the title game. As usual, the final BCS pairing will determined by averaging each team's final rankings in the coaches' poll, the Harris poll, and a computer poll that's not arbitrary and confusing, but always seems that way.  [USA Today]
  • The restarted "last ditch" NBA labor talks resumed Friday in New York after taking a break for Thanksgiving and there's "cautious optimism" that the two sides may be able to reach a deal by the end of the weekend. We've heard that line before, but if it does come to pass this time, the league reportedly wants games to begin on Christmas Day, with teams playing abbreviated 66-game schedules. [New York Daily News]
  • The Columbus Dispatch says that former University of Florida football coach Urban Meyer has already reached a deal to become the next head coach of the Ohio State Buckeyes, but the New York Times says "a handful of obstacles" still have to be resolved before Meyer, who won two national titles at Florida before abruptly resigning last year, agrees to any deal. According to a source, those obstacles getting his family to sign off on a return to the sidelines "further researching just how significant the N.C.A.A. sanctions against Ohio State may be" in the wake of the improper benefits scandal that caused former Buckeyes coach Jim Tressel to resign in May. [The New York Times]
  • American Samoa won its first FIFA-sanctioned match in 17 years, defeating Tonga 2-1. Samoa's currently ranked 204th out of 204 teams in the FIFA standings (Tonga, for its part, was No. 202) and once lost a match to Australia by a score of 31-0. [Dirty Tackle]
  • One of the alleged sex abuse victims of former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky has filed papers in a Pennsylvania state court seeking to stop the Second Mile Charity -- which Sandusky founded in 1977 and supposedly used to cultivate victims -- from transferring any of its assets, which topped $9 million last year. In the papers, the accuser said he and other victims are planning to file civil claims against the charity. [The New York Times]