It was announced today that Bryan Fuller, of Pushing Daisies sorta fame and the creator of an upcoming Hannibal Lecter series, will be making a new version of the 1960s monster sitcom The Munsters. But this won't be some cheesy, hyuk-hyuk affair. Oh no. According to Entertainment Weekly, the series will be "an hour-long series exploring how the monster house came about, and will have a darker and less campy feel than the black-and-white original." Darker! Fascinating. The Munsters was already pretty, pretty dark, so this thing is going to be midnight black. This idea is so crazy it just might work. But why stop there? There are more old sitcoms that could be adapted to better fit these conflicted times. Let's take a look. 

Gilligan's Island:

Seven relative strangers find themselves together on a boat, each with their own mysterious motivations. Among the characters are a shady and possibly criminal millionaire, a drug-addicted ex porn star named Ginger, and an addled scientist recently fired from his professorship at a prestigious university in the wake of a scandal. When they are stranded on a strange island following a freak storm, the strangers are forced to contend with one another as alliances form and are broken, and they quickly realize that it's not the island they should be afraid of, it's each other. A survivalist tale like The Walking Dead meets Lost, TV's next great horror series is Gilligan's Island

My Three Sons:

A widowed father, his three precarious sons. Mike, Robbie, and Chip are all damaged in their own different ways, but the one thing they're all good at is murder. Running an assassins ring out of his own house and employing his three sons, Steve Douglas is a terrifying boss and father. But when one son goes rogue, will Steve make his other two sons hunt him down and kill him? This dramatic series stars Michael Emerson as Steve and Dane DeHaan as black sheep son Robbie. 

I Dream of Jeannie:

Held captive by terrorists in Fallujah for many years, Air Force captain Tony Nelson is forced to retreat into a world of fantasy in order to stay sane. We see his imagined world -- featuring a sensual genie who promises both fulfillment and danger (Tricia Helfer) -- while in the real world Cpt. Nelson plots his escape. What is reality? What is a dream? Homeland meets Once Upon a Time in this fantastical thriller. 

The Courtship of Eddie's Father:

Eddie is a high-class pimp who, despite his many moral failings, is trying to do right by his widower father, a bitter and nasty drunk, by finding him a new wife from among his girls. Snaring Eddie's plans is his father's housekeeper Mrs. Livingston (Ming Na), who has designs on the father's money. 

Leave It to Beaver:

The Cleavers appear to be an All-American family. But behind closed doors they reveal themselves to be anything but. There is the towering patriarch Ward, a relic of another time who tries to rule his family with an iron fist while tortured by inner demons and bitter regret. Teenage son Wally, handsome and popular at school, is fighting his own battle with his sexuality, cruising anonymously in dangerous hookup spots all while pining away desperately for his best friend Eddie Haskell. Youngest son Beaver is an obviously troubled child, prone to pyromania, kleptomania, and a propensity to do terrible harm to animals. And his mother June, picture of motherhood, hides both a secret pill addiction and a wildly sexual affair with her son's friend Eddie. The nuclear family is about to explode, this fall on FX. 

Now you go!