Today in entertainment: Cold water gets thrown on any Book of Mormon movie talk, Roland Emmerich has a secret, high-tech JFK in the works, and your dad's favorite movie is coming to Broadway.

  • There's something refreshing about the way Trey Parker and Matt Stone are refusing to gets fans ginned up for a movie based on their Tony-winning musical The Book of Mormon. "We did a stage show and it worked out way better than we ever thought," Parker told The Hollywood Reporter last night at a 15th anniversary party for the duo's South Park at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica. "[A]nd we’d like it to be that for a while, you know, without contaminating it with a movie.” Take note, Jason Bateman: that is how you say a movie based on a beloved property could be coming, but you're not really sure when. [The Hollywood Reporter]
  • Godzilla director and anti-Stradfordian Roland Emmerich has a mystery project he won't be able to make for another five years, because the technology hasn't caught up with the director's vision yet. (Technology should stop doing that.) What's the movie about? "The title will tell you everything," he promised MTV News' Josh Horowitz in an interview at the Toronto film festival. "It's called Happy Birthday Mr. President." Other than suggesting the film will be about John Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe, the title actually reveals very little. Specifically: why does a film about Kennedy and Monroe's relationship require technology that's still five years down the pike? Unless the White House swimming pool turns into a Stargate, this seems like an effects-free project. [MTV via indieWIRE]
  • Steven Spielberg's Abraham Lincoln biopic has been on the director's radar since 2001, but audiences are going to have to wait until 2013 to see Daniel Day-Lewis' performance as the 16th president, because the filmmaker didn’t want it to become political fodder" for the 2012 election cycle. He added that the film will "not a battlefield movie"--despite having battles in it--and will focus largely on the last four months of Lincoln's life. [Orlando Sentinel]
  • Good news: Diner, director Barry Levinson's 1982 celebration of Baltimore, 24-hour breakfast menus, and marriage based on shared Baltimore Colts knowledge, is being turned into a Broadway musical. Not-so-great news: Sheryl Crow is writing the music. Now, Sheryl Crow is not bad, but she's also not death, in the words of Kevin Bacon. And the original movie had a pretty great soundtrack of oldies to begin with. In Levinson's defense, the movie is full of songs that can practically write themselves: we've already written partial lyrics for "What's on the Flipside?" "A Rational Girl," "Sinatra or Mathis?" and "The Colts Quiz." [Arts Beat]