Welcome to the Smart Set. Every morning we bring you the gossip coverage, filtered. Today: Matthew Fox's party bus driving accuser formally files assault charges, Anthony Weiner and Huma Abedin take Paris, and a D.C. drinking institution is getting an unfortunate upmarket facelit.

  • Heather Bormann, the 29-year-old Cleveland party bus driver who says Matthew Fox drunkenly attacked her Saturday night when she denied him access to her rented coach, formally filed assault charges against the Lost star on Tuesday. The Cleveland prosecutor's office tells CNN it is reviewing the complaint, and that its "investigators did photograph bruises on Bormann's legs and arms that she said she suffered from Fox's blows." Prosecutors still haven't indicated if they will seek a criminal indictment, but based on Bormann's comments yesterday, Fox will probably be seeing her in civil court as well. Cleveland's Fox 8 News reports she's already decided to pursue a civil lawsuit against Fox, telling reporters after she filled out her complaint at the Cleveland City Prosecutor's Office: "He hit me and he should pay the consequences of assaulting a woman." [Fox 8 and CNN via The Hollywood Reporter]
  • Former Representative Anthony Weiner and wife Huma Abedin "babymoon" European tour moved to Paris this week, where the duo was spotted at the Ritz Bar, Ralph Lauren's restaurant Ralph's, and "strolling in the Montmartre district." Parisian romance apparently rubbed off on the couple, who one witness says were acting "really lovey-dovey" during their flight back to the U.S. last night. [Page Six]
  • Splash mermaid Darryl Hannah was "among more than 100 people" who were arrested outside the White House on Tuesday during a protest against the proposed expansion to the Keystone Pipeline System at a demonstration outprotesting the arrested at an environmental protest outside the White House on Tuesday. "We stand here today to just say no to slavery, to just say no to tar, sands, oil, and no to the Keystone pipeline," Hannah was heard to say right before she was pinched. The Keystone pipeline currently transports crude oil from Alberta to refineries in Oklahoma and Illinois. The State Department is expected to rule by the end of the year on a proposal that would expand the pipeline all the way to Mexico. [CNN]
  • Student, knife designer, and underwhelming awards show host James Franco has dropped out of an upcoming production of the Tennessee Williams play Sweet Bird of Youth, which would have been his Broadway debut. The Rise of the Planet of the Apes actor was set to co-star opposite Nicole Kidman, who will have to settle for a new, less-over-scheduled leading man. [The New York Observer]
  • Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel finished ninth in the Chicago Triathalon on Sunday. The secret to his biking, swimming, and running success? Rocking out to Adele's "Rolling in the Deep" with his security detail in the car beforehand. Emanuel told Chicago rock station WXRT on Monday: “We do what my security and I call 'the blowup,' The windows and sunroof go open, we crank it up, and we sing along with Adele. It was a moment of fate for me." Over 10,000 people competed in the race. [The Hollywood Reporter]
  • It wasn't all baby bumps and well-received snubs of Chris Brown for Jay-Z at the MTV Video Music Awards Sunday night.. Witnesses say there was "palpable" tension between Jay and Lil Wayne at the awards show and that the two "never spoke to each other and were separated by security guards during the awards show." Rumors of a beef began swirling when a line from Jay-Z's song "H.A.M."--"Really you got baby money"--was interpreted as a dig at Wayne and Cash Money Records. Wayne responded with his own track "It's Good," and upped the ante with a reference to Jay-Z's bride Beyonce being kidnapped. Jay didn't get much support from his "Watch the Throne" collaborator Kanye West, who "stayed to see Wayne’s performance," while Jay left immediately after Beyonce's number was done. [Page Six
  • Beloved Capitol Hill saloon Hawk 'n' Dove is shutting its doors for six months starting in October so new ownership can convert the no-frills 44-year-old Pennsylvania Avenue watering hole into the kind of place that has "a locally-sourced, seasonal bistro menu," reports the Washington City Paper. If that's the case, we wish it were closing for good. The Hawk deserves better. [Young & Hungry and DCist]