Welcome to the Smart Set. Every morning we bring you the gossip coverage, filtered. Today: Jon Hamm hasn't seen the new Mad Men scripts, Reuters hires Sir Harold Evans for his contacts, and a rock legend is in "pretty dire" condition

  • Update: On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough hit back at the New York Post report, saying the reporter "chose to lie," according to Mediaite which reports that the MSNBC host's contract runs through the end of 2012. Original: With Morning Joe executive producer Chris Licht decamping for CBS, Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski apparently aren't wasting any time gauging interest from other networks about a possible new home for their morning show when their contracts expire later this year. At last week's Newhouse School journalism awards, the duo was overheard making "a tag-team pitch" to Time Warner's Jeff Bewkes, with Scarborough discussing "how much more convenient the commute to CNN's Columbus Circle headquarters would be." Scarborough, for his part, said he was just joking. [New York Post]
  • In their continuing coverage of the relationship of Pippa Middleton and Alex Loudon, the British papers are set to break up. A "friend" of the couple is quoted by The Times of London: "It is common knowledge in their close circle of friends that Pippa and Alex have recently split up." [People]
  • Jon Hamm admits he still hasn't seen any scripts for the upcoming fifth season of Mad Men. "I don't think they exist," he told the BBC. "The way Matthew writes the show is very organically. He starts when he starts and eventually there are scripts but I certainly haven't seen them." The new season of the AMC show is slated to begin shooting in August, with Hamm directing the season premiere. [The Hollywood Reporter]
  • American Media Inc.--which owns the National Enquirer, Radar Online, Star, Shape and Muscle & Fitness--is reportedly for sale, with "private equity giant" Apollo Management as the one potential buyer identified by name. According to the report, Apollo has "stalked" AMI for purchase in recent months, but lately its interest has "cooled" because of concerns about the health of the publishing industry. AMI emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy late last year. [New York Post]
  • Toby Young, best known for working briefly at Vanity Fair and then telling the story in a book, play and film called How to Lose Friends and Alienate People, reported on Twitter that his 6-year-old son's London lemonade stand was robbed. The "scumbag" (his words) "told him to go and get his mum then, when he went into the house, took his float." The net proceeds of the heist: ₤12. [Daily Mail]
  • Reuters will name 82-year-old Sir Harold Evans editor-at-large Monday, in no small part because of his "extraordinary contacts," admitted editor-in-chief Stephen Adler. Evans--who founded Conde Nast Traveler, used to edit The Sunday Times, and is married to Daily Beast/Newsweek editor Tina Brown--will reportedly "moderate events with political and economic figures, consult on new business travel and culture features on Reuters.com, and advise editors on stories and newsroom issues" for Reuters. His first event, featuring Jon Huntsman and Henry Kissinger, is slated for later this week. [Financial Times]
  • Terrible news for Bruce Springsteen fans to begin the week to: 69-year-old E Street Band saxophonist Clarence Clemons suffered a stroke at his home in Florida last night. Reportedly, the situation is "pretty dire" and "members of the E Street Band were advised to get down to Florida as soon as possible." Clemons, long a Springsteen fan favorite for his extended solos and genial stage presence, played saxophone for two songs on Lady Gaga's new album and was featured on the American Idol season finale. Get well soon, Big Man. [Showbiz411]