Prince William and Kate Middleton will be married in three days. Until then, royal-fatigued media outlets will have to keep coming up with new and highly-specific ways of covering the wedding. Here are some of the ways newspapers managed to keep the couple and the ceremony in the news. Here's the T-minus 3 update. Check back tomorrow for T-minus 2, and check out past installments here.

"Royal wedding rain may be a treat for history buffs" -- CBS News

Not only will rain not ruin the ceremony, a few showers actually have the potential to enhance Friday's celebration, at least for history buffs watching at home. Why? Because if there's a storm, Prince William and Kate Middleton won't be able to travel to Buckingham Palace in an "open-top 1902 red and gold State Landau" as planned. Instead, they'll be forced "leave Westminster Abbey in the glass coach that Lady Diana took to St. Paul's Cathedral on July 29, 1981." That does sound historic.

"Royal wedding flowers: All the details" -- People

Kate Middleton's bridal bouquet, on the other hand, will not be a treat for history lovers. Speculation is she's passing on the traditional all-white blossoms for a combination of azaleas, lilacs, rhododendron and wisteria.

"Guess whose wedding America really cares about" -- Salon

Not Prince William and Kate's. The royal duo couldn't even beat out the newly-engaged duo of Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (right) and Laguna Beach star Kristin Cavallari for the top spots on the Google Hot Search list this morning. And people don't even like Jay Cutler!

"Police horses prepare for royal wedding" -- The Telegraph

Scotland Yard has finally settled on 11 horses for the ceremonial 'Grey Escort' that guards the wedding procession. The Telegraph notes that all 11 are "operational police horses" and selected because of their "grey colour and calm temperaments." The story includes a two-minute video of other police horses doing police horse things.



"Royal wedding security: Social media tactics revealed" -- ABC News

Scotland Yard is confident that their 5,000 officer "ring of steel" will protect "nut magnets" William and Kate from any sort of attack. But just to make sure, they've started "closely watching Facebook...where some activists are calling for protests along the parade route." The focus on social media chatter reflects authorities' "growing concern about the anger being vented online toward the royal wedding, such as a photo of William and Middleton with nooses around their necks that was posted by a group called the Anarchist Media Project."