Prince William and Kate Middleton will be married in four days. Until then, royal-fatigued media outlets will have to keep coming up with new and highly-specific ways of covering the wedding. Here are some of the ways newspapers managed to keep the couple and the ceremony in the news. Here's the T-minus 4 roundup. Come back tomorrow for T-minus 3, and check out past installments here.

"Royal wedding guest list: Who was left off?" -- CBS News

The most popular subject of royal wedding discussion was the final guest list. For every surprising name that was included (the Politico-owning Allbrittons), there was another that was left off the guest list (the crown prince of Bahrain, though whether he turned down an invite or was "politically sidelined by senior royal advisers" is unclear). And don't even get Diana's old friends started on the fact that Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (nee Parker-Bowles) will be in attendance.

"Royal wedding attractive target for Al Qaeda, says radical U.K. cleric" -- ABC News

For anyone unconvinced by the Reuters report last week about Prince William and Kate Middleton being "nut magnets," ABC's Brian Ross has a new interview with Anjem Choudary, a British cleric who calls the ceremony a "prime target" for a terrorist attack. "There's nothing really which is outside of the realm of a possible attack, from biological to nuclear to very high profile events like 9/11," explained Choudary. "So I think it's a case of all-out war."

"Piece of cake? Not if it's for the royal wedding" -- USA Today

The world has already been introduced to the ceremony's hatmaker, so why not the pastry chef baking the cake for the big day. Her name is Fiona Cairns and she's also baked for Bono and Paul McCartney and plans on using a "a traditional technique of intricate piping to create 3-D scrollwork, leaves and flowers." Because nothing says "traditional" like "3-D scrollwork."

"Palace worried royal wedding will get rained out" -- Us magazine

When all else fails, there's always the weather to discuss. Specifically, the fact there's a sixty percent of showers Friday. "Hopefully the rain will stay away!" an unnamed "palace insider" tells the tabloid, although it's unclear what the source is worried about; Westminster Abbey has a roof for a reason, and the Buckingham Palace events staff is already stocking up on umbrellas.

"In London, the royal wedding haters have had enough" -- The Washington Post

It turns out people in London are also weary of round-the-clock royal wedding updates. Other grievances cited by Britons: the constant "Diana comparisons," the wedding's cost to British taxpayers, and relatives who insist you send them Kate Middleton commemorative plates.