One day--possibly early next year--some enterprising sociologist from NYU or the University of Arizona will publish findings on why certain memes are predisposed to take Twitter by storm. Until then, it's anyone's guess. Which is a good thing, because there's no more welcome surprise in the Internet age than starting up one's computer and discovering the best and brightest of Twitter deeply immersed in pitching #sadchildrensbooks. A sampling of their most compelling ideas:


Diary of a Wimpy Kid Who Was Mercilessly Bullied #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web




@carr2n "Horton Hears A Proposal For Federal InterUrban Rail Subsidies" #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web




"Howl's Moving Outhouse"#sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web


The Berenstain Bears Encounter Mama Grizzly.  #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web



Guess How Much You Owe Me #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web



Wikipedia Brown Makes a Bad Mistake #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web



Lilly's Purple Plastic Purgatory #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web


Hansel and Greta VanSusteren #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web


James and the Giant Mood Swing #sadchildrensbooksless than a minute ago via web