Internationally-renowned journalist Fareed Zakaria is leaving Newsweek to head to Time. This loss of another marquee talent has put the spotlight back on the ailing newsweekly, which has been the subject of much debate since it was sold by the Washington Post company for $1 to 91-year-old billionaire Sidney Harman

  • 'Another Blow to Newsweek,' notes The New York Times' David Carr, breaking the full story Wednesday. Newsweek "was sold to Sidney Harman, an audio equipment mogul, at the beginning of the month. Several prominent writers and editors have left the magazine recently, including the editor, Jon Meacham; a columnist, Evan Thomas; and an investigative reporter, Michael Isikoff." The difference between those and Zakaria is that Zakaria "is going to the struggling weekly's direct competitor." Meanwhile, Time's editor tells Carr the acquisition "signal[s] ... the magazine want[s] a significant footprint in the discussions of global matters and [is] doing well enough as a business to remain ambitious."
  • Not a 'Huge Shock,' suggests Jocelyn Rousey at Mediaite, given both "Newsweek's recent plight" and Zakaria's "strong connection to Time's parent company Time Warner" through his CNN show.
  • 'Mee-owch,' says Gawker's Hamilton Nolan, succinctly. "Not only is vaguely intelligent-sounding columnist Fareed Zakaria leaving Newsweek; he's going to write a column for its competitor."
  • 'Arguably the Biggest Name on Newsweek's Masthead,' comments Business Insider's Joe Pompeo, who notes that Zakaria is leaving after he had been rumored as a replacement for the outgoing editor-in-chief. Pompeo then suggests that other staffers may be leaving soon as well: "We also hear Harman has said he will give four months severance pay to anyone who is let go, and that a number of staffers have already raised their hands volunteering for that deal."