On Friday, the Atlantic Wire reported on the Twitter spat between Business Insider head Henry Blodget and Reuters blogger Felix Salmon. The two argued about the relationship between good journalistic ethics and a decent publishing model (among other things). In heat of the digital back-and-forth, Salmon, one of the most prominent business commentators, made a passing reference to the business model of Gawker founder-and-proprietor Nick Denton, noting that "the old days of link-plus-snark are over." Salmon refers to Denton's business model more thoroughly in a post on "blogonomics" for Reuters:

This is one area where I think that Henry could take a leaf out of Nick Denton’s book, and refuse to run deeply-discounted ads. Doing that helps to improve the value of the brand among advertisers, and it also creates interesting opportunities for rewarding staff. At such a website, there will always be unsold inventory; at Gawker Media, that inventory is given over to the Gawker Artists program. At TBI, the inventory could be given over to staff journalists, in proportion to their pageviews the previous month, to donate to whichever organization they think could make best use of some free advertising on the site.
Gawker writers are crucially aware of the changing nature of blog-based journalism, and Denton pulled rank as a media mogul and tried to put Salmon in his place with a salvo of tweets. Denton begins with a harsh correction...
http://bit.ly/9HrHbb @felixsalmon You are clueless: ALL sites discount from rate card; and they run network ads if they don't have scale.
...before taking a serious swipe:
@felixsalmon I get that you've never seen a media business from the inside. But stop pretending expertise. It's becoming embarrassing.
Denton also disses Salmon in passing tweet:
@antderosa Every numerically irrelevant group -- French filmmakers, Felix and co -- likes to think it compensates with influence.
Salmon could only offer these relatively meek replies:
@nicknotned did you run network ads when you were TBI's size?
@nicknotned Sites boast about the CPMs they get, but they're very quiet on their RPMs. No one's transparent on that front.