Communist China Turns 60 
Inspired by the ruling party's 60th anniversary, the National Post's Peter Goodspeed writes a sweeping essay on China's extraordinary military advancements in recent years and explains why the U.S. should fear the burgeoning hegemon. Commenting on China from another angle, the New York Times' Thomas Friedman extols the country's ambitious green energy goals, declaring Red China "Green China."

Talking Nukes with Iran
 
As we covered here, international pressure concerning Iran's nuclear program is reaching a tipping point following the revelation of a secret uranium-enrichment facility. On Thursday, the permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany will confront Iran and possibly impose sanctions on the country. The Huffington Post's Raymond Learsy says reining in Iran can be done by setting up a global boycott of Iranian oil. Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal calls Obama's approach to Ahmedinejad delusional

Unemployment Numbers 

On Friday, the Labor Department will release its September unemployment report. While many worry that unemployment could reach 10 percent, Bloomberg's Rich Miller, in a comprehensive article, argues that America's jobs recovery will be longer and more protracted than many are predicting.

Ireland Holds Referendum on Lisbon Treaty
 
On Friday, 1.5 million Irish men and women will vote on a treaty affecting the business and politics of all of Europe's 500 million citizens, delivering what many see as a popular referendum on the European Union as whole. According to polls, the Irish will likely vote yes. But in a harrowing column in the Wall Street Journal, Brian Carney argues why voting 'no' will save both democracy and European civilization.

Melding Two Health Care Bills into One
 
This week, Harry Reid is tasked with forging two competing health care bills into one. It appears he will look to President Obama to "arbitrate" between liberal and centrist Democrats during the legislative process. In a frustrated tirade, P.M. Carpenter at Buzz Flash mourns over the fractionalized Democratic Party and concludes that conservative presidents have a much easier time corralling Congress than progressive presidents.