At long last, McDonald’s has pulled back the curtain and put out a video revealing how its trademarked Chicken McNuggets are really made.

The video starts with a foreboding question from a concerned customer: “What are legitimately in mcnuggets is there pink goop? [sic]”

This is the pink goop to which the question probably refers:

KSDK-TV

This photograph circulated around the world a few years back, under the mistaken impression that this poisonous looking slop was what McNuggets were actually made out of. The pink goop, supposedly, is the result of mixing scraps of meat with ammonium hydroxide.

Nicoletta Stefou, supply chain manager for McDonald’s Canada, wants to put an end to these rumors. Referring to the slime in the video, she says: “We don’t know what it is or where it came from, but it has nothing to do with our Chicken McNuggets.”

It might not have anything to with McDonald’s now, but ammonium hydroxide certainly has been used in food production in the past – so much so that McDonald’s had to confirm that it had ceased using the chemical.

The pink slime is nowhere to be seen in this video, though. Instead, we’re treated to a fairly mundane walkthrough of the McNugget process. Whole chickens are strung up on a factory line and stripped of their meat, which is then tossed into giant bins lined with plastic. The collected meat is mashed up, pushed through a grinder, cut into shapes (bell, boot, bone, and ball), coated in batter, and fried. After that is done, the McNuggets are frozen, bagged, boxed, and shipped to McDonald’s restaurants around the world, before reaching their final stop in your stomach.

That really gets your appetite going, doesn’t it?