The news that 98 percent Goldman Sachs employees' emailed "muppet" mentions were reference to the recent Jason Segal movie or intra-office name-calling is funny enough without mocking the reporter who brought us such a giggly scoop. Though it turns out we should anyway. Fox Business' Charlie Gasparino actually had to stifle his own laughter as he reported his finding into the results of Goldman Sachs' "muppet hunt," suggesting he might not have taken the assignment all that seriously. But, in fact, it's real news he's reporting—If a bit silly. Unfortunately, the report goes no more in-depth than Gasparino's initial tweet on the subject.

Remember how Goldman Sachs promised to sift through all its email for the word "muppet," after Greg Smith's allegation that workers referred to clients with that put-down in his notorious New York Times op-ed? Nearly three weeks later, Gasparino followed up, finding that all but 2 percent of the mentions of "muppets" referred to the movie, and the rest were employees making fun of each other. So, if you're a Goldman Sachs client, it's a good bet no one called you "muppet" behind your back.

Dealbreaker had a good laugh at Gasparino's crusade for the truth about muppet usage, which in fairness was pretty funny as he "breathlessly" tweeted his progress: "While a lesser journalist would have been content to take the source at his or her word, Charles Gasparino is no such journalist. He get kept digging on this one and now, amazingly, has more to add," Dealbreaker's Bess Levin wrote Wednesday. She's clearly being sarcastic, but the first few seconds of Gasparino's report did update viewers on a story they might've forgotten.

Disappointingly, instead of revealing what Goldman Sachs employees said about the Muppet movie or giving hilarious examples of them ripping on each other, Gasparino spent the rest of the segment rehashing Smith's book deal and how he would spend his $1.5 million fee in a Bankok sex club. Sigh. Bring on the Gasparino mocking, after all.