Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

The home page leads with a wrap-up of Hurricane Irene's impact on the New York City area, which escaped, for the most part, the serious damage being predicted. Also high on the page in post-storm coverage, an updating story on Monday morning's snarled commute as subways and regional rail come back online. And you should definitely catch the media story on how Anonymous's love of those Guy Fawkes masks makes for a nice little payout for licensee Time Warner.

World: The lead story, on the search for the enigmatic former Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, is well worth your click. The report on Sunday's bombing of a Baghdad mosque is available elsewhere, so you may want to skip it. But you shouldn't miss this story from Italy, where the mayor of one tiny town has applied to become a principality to avoid the country's emergency cost-saving measure requiring small towns to consolidate their populations with their neighbors.

U.S.: Hurricane news dominates the section, and a report on those who rode out the storm in one North Carolina marina is well worth your click. And in crime news, a New Jersey Supreme Court decision to change the rules on police lineups could have effects outside the Garden State.

Business: The lead story, on the Weather Channel's wind-battered reporters, is a good read for those who stayed glued to the television as Hurricane Irene passed through. And even though the damage was universally seen as below expectations, the storm still spells trouble for the insurance industry, which has made a lot of weather-related payouts this year. 

Technology: Don't miss Nick Bilton's report on how the Guy Fawkes masks favored by Anonymous protesters are licensed by Time Warner, one of the biggest media companies out there. 

Sports: As the U.S. Open gets ready to start, check out the report on toe faults, the tiny infractions that can infuriatingly disqualify serves. 

Opinion: Dalton Conley, a sociology professor at NYU, has the lead op-ed on how Facebook and other sites are taking all the randomness out of roommate selection.

Arts: In case you missed them, read up on the MTV Video Music Awards.