Now that the New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Don't miss the top story on mutton busting, an offbeat piece about a toddler rodeo sport that The Times calls "the pint-sized equivalent of competitive bull riding involving lambs and small children. (The accompanying slideshow is also a must.) The coverage of an intricate framing in Queens will appeal to crime TV fans as the details of the case could be straight out of Law and Order. Those who have been following the News Corp. scandal will be interested in the latest piece on Rupert Murdoch and his relationship with his newspapers.

World: The still-unfolding drama created by the assassination of Afghan president Hamid Karzai's brother is distilled into an article about the tribal battle for control of the region he'd led. A piece on new Wi-Fi monitoring regulations in China will remind you that Facebook's privacy policy in the U.S. is not that bad.

U.S.: There's a glut of debt ceiling debate in free papers today, so spend your time either on the report about Hispanics being hit the hardest by the recession or how helicopters are clogging the airspace above Los Angeles.

Business: If you don't know much about manufacturing in India, this report on their surge in exports is a great primer. A sobering account of how employers don't want to hire unemployed people gives you a picture of what's happening with the economy here in the U.S.

Technology: You might also be interested in getting to know the hackers arrested by the FBI last week a bit better with this follow-up piece in which they talk about their reasons for hacking. Those who read about the fake Apple Stores in China might be interested to learn how the real Apple stores are doing there (pretty well).

Science: This package on how animals are evolving for urban environment is captivating, as is this review of "Another Earth," a film that, as the name implies, explores the possibility of another planet like ours in the universe.

Opinion: The top op-ed from chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen about our relationship with China feels important, but the column by Roger Cohen about the Norway attacks and Islamophobia is a bit more gripping.

Arts: You probably read about him in college, so this piece on Marshall McLuhan's newfound relevance is a good refresher. 

Style: Several people have written stories about gay couples in New York now feeling pressure from their parents to get married--here's The Times version. In a more unique beat, this post on wildly expensive playhouses is both perplexing and fascinating.