Now that the New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

The latest and quite worthwhile installment of the India's Way, a series that "explores the messy and maddening road to progress in India," digs into billionaires' involvement in the development process there. You might also check out an update on the process to replace Anthony Weiner and in turn find Israel's next best friend.

World: You'll be tempted to see what will happen to James Murdoch at Thursday's BSkyB board meeting, but the British press will have deeper coverage for free. Give the article about Palestinian women who risk arrest to go to the beach in Tel Aviv a look instead.

U.S.: Mariachi bands in Los Angeles are falling on hard times, and their story of struggle bears broader meaning than you might think. On the opposite coast, the piece about the lives of can and bottle collectors in Brooklyn makes for a good read. And in lighter news, the Phoenix Zoo now has an exhibit on squirrels.

Business: In two well-timed pieces, The Times explains how a debt downgrade will affect consumers, and David Leonhardt, the paper's new D.C. bureau chief, offers insights from lessons learned covering the economy for the past decade in his last piece for the Business section. 

Technology: Geeks and history buffs alike will be fascinated with the survey on how digital maps are helping scholars better visualize major events like the Battle of Gettysburg.

Sports: If you followed the lockout, you might be interested in learning a bit about what the players are doing in with their very short off season. You might also check out the full story of how the Texas Rangers dealt with the death of a fan who fell over the railing at their stadium.

Arts: Check out the report on how the books industry is responding to ebooks with quicker paperback publishing. Also Zack Braff's new play gets a theater review that's worth a glance.

Food: Don't miss the article on how chefs are using what would normally be considered trash to jazz up their dishes