So far, the alleged list of morbid targets of the News of the World's phone hacking include a murdered girl, the victims families of the 7/7/2005 subway bombings, and princess Diana's family's former lawyer. And now The Telegraph adds another: grieving relatives of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. The newspaper found the phone numbers and "personal details of the families of servicemen who died on the front line have been found in the files of Glenn Mulcaire, the private detective working for the Sunday tabloid."

The most recent allegations don't include the humongous list of celebrities, royals and government officials who've previously been documented in Vanity Fair and The Guardian as targets over the years. Advertisers are now reportedly ditching the tabloid's pages.

In response to the latest reports, UK prime minister David Cameron set up a public inquiry, the BBC reported. And yesterday News Corp mogul Rupert Murdoch went into damage-control mode, releasing a statement standing by former News of the World editor Rebekah Brooks and calling the hackings "deplorable." This morning, The New York Times led its homepage with an overview of the mess, noting that this time the allegations threaten "to stain the company's image in a way that other embarrassing incidents...have not."