Now that the New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

The big news on the home page today is Dominique Strauss-Kahn's resignation as director of the International Monetary Fund, which was starting to seem inevitable and now is official. The one-time favorite to challenge Nicolas Sarkozy as president of France remains in the Rikers Island jail with a second bail hearing scheduled for today. The must-read story today, however. is on the monetary shortcomings of private prisons.

World: Aside from Strauss-Kahn's resignation, highlights here include Robert Gates' assertion that Pakistani leadership didn't know Osama bin Laden was hiding on its soil, and this roundup of Middle East anticipation of President Barack Obama's speech. But the coolest story you'll read here is the one about Chinese power players who sneak around government-controlled airspace in private helicopters.

U.S.: You should definitely read the exclusive report that private prisons don't bring substantial savings. Also of interest is the feature on the women associated with the Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Arnold Schwarzenegger headlines.

Business: The news (borrowed from World) that French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde leads the field to replace Strauss-Kahn is important, but others have been covering it a little more closely. Also important, and more unique to The Times, is Catherine Rampell's report on the tough job market for new college graduates.

Science: In a fascinating discovery, astronomers have announced that there are billions of planets adrift in our galaxy without orbiting stars.

Health: A somewhat controversial blood test that may indicate longevity is going on sale. Tellingly, the story is cross-posted from business.

Sports: The game story to read today is the Heat's NBA playoff win against the Bulls. But for a bit of intrigue, you'll want to check out the report on Jim Crane, who has been accused of running a discriminatory business, and what that means for his bid to buy the Astros.

Opinion: In the lead Op-Ed, anthropologist Hans Lucht takes Europe to task for ignoring the flood of immigrants from war-torn Libya.

Arts: You can almost hear the collective sigh of the world's Thoreau scholars while reading about Suzanne Orlean's exclusively e-book essays on her farm life.

Style: Check out the feature on the rather sweet trend in graffiti: yarn bombing.

Travel: The Practical Traveler has tips on traveling with your pet.