Now that the New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 20 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Today's lead story explores how China may be at risk for runaway inflation and is an interesting read, even for economics amateurs. The report from medical tents in Libya offers a sobering but important perspective from the wartorn country, and the accompanying timeline of the conflict is helpful. Otherwise, dive into today's business section for a glut of good media news.

World: Don't miss this piece of analysis on the tension over America's presence in Pakistan. You might be interested in this look at about religion in China, where an illegal church is battling the government. Skip the Middle East news--you'll find it elsewhere--and dive into the paper's story about France's colonial past in North Africa. It's just as relevant.

U.S.: The weekend weather is the top national story, and this slideshow tells the story best. You'll probably hear elsewhere about Geithner's warning about rising the debt ceiling. However, this fresh perspective on public education reform serves as a nice reminder of who's driving that conversation. (Spoiler: They all went to private school.)

Opinion: In the wake of Obama's debt speech and the critics who found it divisive, Paul Krugman leads off the week with a much-needed reminder that politics should embrace conflict when it's due. Ross Douthat's rebuttal warns against raising taxes but fails to add much value to the conversatin.

Business: Media news carries today's business section. If you're into that kind of thing, check out David Carr's report on how the Minneapolis Star Tribune turned itself around. And you might not know it yet, but you're sure to be fascinated with this story how monks are using the internet lately. You might also read this scoop about how nobody at NBC actually believes Donald Trump will run for president.

Technology: Don't miss this "unvarnished peek into Microsoft's history" if only to check out the accompanying photo of the original Microsoft employees. Do miss the summary of how Paul Ceglia says he owns half of Facebook and the short piece about copyright school on YouTube. We covered both stories on the Atlantic Wire last week.

Sports: As usual, today's Monday Sports section is fat with roundups and score reports. Skip them and spend your clicks on bigger picture news like this story on the difference between Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens' steroids stories. Basketball fans might like to learn about how flying elbows are influencing the game.

Arts: Get ready for Passover with a bit of history about the Haggadah thanks to a recent exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. And even though it's from the weekend, you should definitely check out this zeitgeisty piece about the ukulele craze.