Velma Hart, a mother of two who criticized President Obama's economic policies in a widely-viewed televised Q&A session, has lost her job. Losing her position as a chief financial officer for Am Vets, a veterans service non profit, Hart tells CNBC, "I want to focus on the positive and assume that somehow things will work out, that there’s an opportunity out there with Velma’s name on it that’s right around the corner."

Jim King, an executive director at AM Vets told The Washington Post, "It's not anything she did... She got bit by the same snake that has bit a lot of people. It was a move to cut our bottom line. Most not-for-profits are seeing their money pinched."

Here's Hart's famous Q&A moment (around 1:15) followed by reactions in the blogosphere:


Even when she addressed Obama in a September 20 CNBC town hall meeting on the economy, Ms. Hart knew that the recent recession had put her job in danger through its dampening effect on donations, memberships and sponsorships at AmVets. She had hoped to remain on the job to help AmVets weather the financial storm, but instead became one of its casualties.

Remember, this woman lives in the Washington, DC area. This area has been relatively insulated from the economic problems facing America because there are so many government workers. All I can suggest is pray for Velma and her family. This is a tough day for them.

  • She Should Start Voting Republican, writes a wishful-thinking Moe Lane at Redstate:
Hey. Just throwing it out, there.  It seems wasteful to have such a great personal narrative there and not use it...  So why not explore other options?
  • Sadly Obama Hasn't Delivered, writes Big Tent Democrat at Talk Left: "Ms. Hart spoke for many when she asked President Obama whether this was the 'new reality.' I'm not sure what the Obama Administration has to offer." The blogger notes pessimistically that Hart plans to to take advantage of the administration's mortgage loan-modification program. "With the incompetent and corrupt Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner around, that's not much hope imo... The prime directive coming out of Treasury is ‘protect the banks’ and don’t force them to recognize their losses."